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RISKS OF ARTHROSCOPY

General Anesthetic risks are extremely rare in Australia. Occasionally patients have some discomfort in the throat as a result of the tube that supplies oxygen and other gasses. Please discuss with the Specialist Anesthetist if you have any specific concerns Risks related to Arthroscopic Knee Surgery Include:

  • Postoperative bleeding
  • Deep Vein Thrombosis
  • Infection
  • Stiffness
  • Numbness to part of the skin near the incisions
  • Injury to vessels, nerves and a chronic pain syndrome
  • Progression of the disease process
The risks and complications of arthroscopic knee surgery are extremely small. One must however bear in mind that occasionally there is more damage in the knee than was initially thought and that this may affect the recovery time. In addition if the cartilage in the knee is partly worn out then arthroscopic surgery has about a 65% chance of improving symptoms in the short to medium term but more definitive surgery may be required in the future. In general arthroscopic surgery does not improve knees that have well established Osteoarthritis.
Post –Operative Exercises and Physical Therapy Following your surgery you will be given an instruction sheet showing exercises that are helpful in speeding up your recovery. Strengthening your thigh muscles (Quadriceps and Hamstrings) is most important. Swimming and cycling (stationary or road) are excellent ways to build these muscles up and improve movement.

Frequently asked questions:

A: Approximately 4 hours

A: Usually not required (Unless you are having Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction)

A: After 24 hrs remove the bandage and apply a waterproof dressing.

A: After 24 hrs if the knee is comfortable.

A: When the knee feels reasonably comfortable.

A: After removal of the stitches.

A: Depending on the findings and surgery, usually 4 to 6 weeks following the surgery.

A: Depending on the findings, 4-6 weeks after surgery.

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